0
Articles |

Palliative Care*

Paul A. Kvale, MD, FCCP; Michael Simoff, MD, FCCP; Udaya B. S. Prakash, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy, Immunology, and Sleep Disorders Medicine (Drs. Kvale and Simoff), Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI; and Division of Thoracic Medicine (Dr. Prakash), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Correspondence to: Paul A. Kvale, MD, FCCP, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy, Immunology, and Sleep Disorders Medicine, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Blvd, Detroit, MI 48202; e-mail: pkvale1@hfhs.org



Chest. 2003;123(1_suppl):284S-311S. doi:10.1378/chest.123.1_suppl.284S
Text Size: A A A
Published online

The majority of patients who acquire lung cancer will have troublesome symptoms at some time during the course of their disease. Some of the symptoms are common to many types of cancers, while others are more often encountered with lung cancer than other primary sites. The most common symptoms are pain, dyspnea, and cough. This document will address the management of these symptoms, and it will also address the palliation of specific problems that are commonly seen in lung cancer: metastases to the brain, spinal cord, and bones; hemoptysis; tracheoesophageal fistula; and obstruction of the superior vena cava.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543