0
Selected Reports |

Endobronchial Lipoma*: Review of 64 Cases Reported in Japan

Masashi Muraoka, MD; Tadayuki Oka, MD; Shinji Akamine, MD; Takeshi Nagayasu, MD; Masachika Iseki, PhD; Naofumi Suyama, MD; Hiroyoshi Ayabe, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the First Department of Surgery (Drs. Muraoka, Oka, Akamine, Nagayasu, and Ayabe), and Department of Pathology, Institute of Tropical Medicine (Dr. Iseki), Nagasaki University School of Medicine; and Nagasaki Adult Disease Medical Center (Dr. Suyama), Nagasaki, Japan.

Correspondence to: Masashi Muraoka, MD, The First Department of Surgery, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8102, Japan; e-mail: ceb17760@hkg.odn.ne.jp



Chest. 2003;123(1):293-296. doi:10.1378/chest.123.1.293
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: Several recent studies discuss bronchoscopic techniques for treating endobronchial lipoma, an extremely rare benign tumor.

Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of endobronchial lipoma and to propose appropriate therapeutic policies for treating this tumor.

Methods: We reviewed 64 cases of endobronchial lipoma: 33 cases previously reported in 30 different articles, and 31 case reports presented at thoracic meetings in Japan.

Results: Of the 64 patients included in this study (50 male and 14 female; mean age, 60 years), 40 patients had endobronchial lipoma in the right lung and 23 patients had it in the left lung. The overwhelming majority of the tumors (n = 61) were found in the first three subdivisions of the tracheobronchial tree. Forty-eight patients (75%) were symptomatic, and their symptoms included cough, sputum, hemoptysis, elevated temperature, and dyspnea. Additionally, abnormal radiographic findings were reported for 51 patients (80%): 18 patients had atelectasis, 14 patients had infiltration or consolidation, 6 patients showed volume loss of the lung, and mass shadow was identified in 9 patients, and another abnormality including pleural effusion was found in 4 patients. Forty patients underwent surgical resection: 4 pneumonectomies, 24 lobectomies, 8 bilobectomies, and 4 resections by bronchotomy. Bronchoscopic resection was carried out in 17 cases: 7 cases by Nd-YAG laser, 5 cases by electrosurgical snaring forceps, and another 5 cases with a combined therapy using both procedures.

Conclusions: Bronchoscopic resection should be considered as the first choice of treatment for endobronchial lipoma; however, surgical therapy is indicated for patients who show the possibility of a complicated malignant tumor, who have destructive peripheral lung disease, who have extrabronchial growth, or who may have technical difficulties during the bronchoscopic procedure.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543