0
Special Reports |

Family Member Presence During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation*: A Survey of US and International Critical Care Professionals

CPT Bruce M. McClenathan, MC, USA; COL Kenneth G. Torrington, MC, USA; Catherine F.T. Uyehara, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Medicine (Cpt McClenathan and Col Torrington) and the Department of Clinical Investigation (Dr. Uyehara), Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI.

Correspondence to: Cpt Bruce McClenathan, MC, USA, Department of Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, 1 Jarrett White Rd, Honolulu, HI 96859; e-mail: Bruce.McClenathan@amedd.army.mil



Chest. 2002;122(6):2204-2211. doi:10.1378/chest.122.6.2204
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objective: Recent international emergency cardiovascular care (ECC) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines have recommended that health-care professionals allow family members to be present during resuscitation attempts. To assess whether critical care professionals support these recommendations, we surveyed health-care professionals for their opinions regarding family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR).

Methods: We surveyed health-care professionals attending the International Meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians in San Francisco, CA, from October 23 to 26, 2000, about their CPR experience, their opinions on FWR, and demographic characteristics. The opinions of physicians, nurses, and other allied health professionals were compared, and differences in opinions based on demographics were examined.

Results: Five hundred ninety-two professionals were surveyed. Fewer physicians (20%) than nurses and allied health-care workers combined (39%) would allow family member presence during adult CPR (p = 0.0037 [χ2 test]). Fourteen percent of physicians and 17% of nurses would allow a family presence during pediatric CPR. There was a significant difference among the opinions of US professionals, based on regional location. Professionals practicing in the northeastern states were less likely than other US professionals to allow FWR during adult or pediatric resuscitations (p = 0.016 and p < 0.001, respectively [χ2 test]). Midwestern professionals were more likely than others to allow family members to be present during an adult resuscitation, when compared to professional in the rest of the nation (p = 0.002 [χ2 test]). Health-care professionals disapproving of family member presence during CPR did so because of the fear of psychological trauma to family members, performance anxiety affecting the CPR team, medicolegal concerns, and a fear of distraction to the resuscitation team.

Conclusions: Our evaluation indicated that the majority of critical care professionals surveyed do not support the current recommendations provided by the ECC and CPR guidelines of 2000.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543