0
Clinical Investigations: ASTHMA |

Maximal Airway Response in Adolescents With Long-term Asthma Remission and Persisting Airway Hypersensitivity*: Its Profile and the Effect of Inhaled Corticosteroids

Young Yull Koh, MD; Yang Park, MD; Chang Keun Kim, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul; and the Department of Pediatrics, Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Correspondence to: Young Yull Koh, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744, Korea; e-mail: kohyy@plaza.snu.ac.kr



Chest. 2002;122(4):1214-1221. doi:10.1378/chest.122.4.1214
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: Many children with asthma go into long-term clinical remission at adolescence, but bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) persists in some of these subjects. BHR in asthma is characterized by an increase in sensitivity and in maximal airway response to bronchoconstrictor stimuli.

Objective: The aims of this study were to compare the profiles of maximal airway response between adolescents with asthma remission and adolescents with symptomatic asthma to a similar degree of airway hypersensitivity, and to determine whether maximal airway response in adolescents with asthma remission is reduced by prolonged treatment with inhaled corticosteroids.

Methods: A high-dose methacholine inhalation test was performed in 46 adolescents with long-term asthma remission (remission group) and 44 adolescents with symptomatic asthma (symptomatic group). Subjects exhibiting a maximal response plateau in the remission group were administered inhaled budesonide (400 μg bid, budesonide/remission group, n = 15) or identical placebo (placebo/remission group, n = 15) for 6 months, and the subjects in the symptomatic group were administered the same regimen of budesonide (budesonide/symptomatic group, n = 17). The plateau level was measured after 3 months and 6 months of treatment.

Results: Thirty-four subjects (73.9%) in the remission group featured a maximal response plateau on the dose-response curve to methacholine, whereas 19 subjects (43.2%) in the symptomatic group had a plateau (p = 0.003). In neither the placebo/remission group nor the budesonide/remission group did the plateau level change significantly over the 6-month period, whereas budesonide markedly decreased the level in the budesonide/symptomatic group.

Conclusion: The difference in frequency of detection of a plateau between the remission group and the symptomatic group, as well as the difference in its response to treatment with budesonide between the two groups, suggests that inflammatory changes impact the maximal airway response in symptomatic asthmatic adolescents but not in adolescents with asthma remission.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
Airway Responsiveness to Adenosine 5′-Monophosphate and Exhaled Nitric Oxide Measurements*: Predictive Value as Markers for Reducing the Dose of Inhaled Corticosteroids in Asthmatic Subjects
Airway Tissue Mast Cells in Persistent Asthma*: Predictor of Treatment Failure When Patients Discontinue Inhaled Corticosteroids
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543