0
Editorials |

Cultures and Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia : Not How, But How Many

David L. Bowton, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Winston-Salem, NC
 ,  Dr. Bowton is Professor, Internal Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care) and Anesthesiology (Critical Care), Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Correspondence to: David L. Bowton, MD, FCCP, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1054; e-mail: dbowton@wfubmc.edu



Chest. 2002;122(2):401-402. doi:10.1378/chest.122.2.401
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

Pneumonia remains a common yet vexing complication of critical illness. While it is the most common nosocomial infection in ICUs, and the one most commonly associated with death, its diagnosis remains the subject of ongoing investigations, heated debate, and a disquieting amount of “art of medicine.” The article by Wu and colleagues in this issue of CHEST (see page 662) does not, of itself, provide insight into how we may improve outcomes for our patients suspected of having nosocomial pneumonia (and specifically ventilator-associated pneumonia [VAP]). It does, however, add to an increasing body of evidence that suggests that, when cultured quantitatively, invasive and noninvasively obtained cultures should provide comparable information. Linking this with improved outcomes for our patients is more problematic and involves an assessment of the risks of inappropriate treatment, whether changing antibiotic therapy in response to culture data alters outcome, and the role that antibiotic use patterns play in the selection of drug-resistant pathogens in the ICU.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543