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Editorials |

Snoring May Not Mean That You Had a Good Night’s Sleep

Edward Morgan, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Honolulu, HI
 ,  Dr. Morgan is an Associate Professor at the University of Hawaii School of Medicine, and Director of the Sleep Center at the Kuakini Medical Center.

Correspondence to: Edward Morgan, MD, FCCP, Suite 405, 321 N Kuakini St, Honolulu, HI 96817; e-mail:lungs@ATTGlobal.net



Chest. 2002;122(2):398-399. doi:10.1378/chest.122.2.398
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Extract

Folk tales are common in Asia as to what constitutes a good night’s sleep. “Snoring at night means you have had a good night’s sleep” is one. “Drinking tea at night means you will have a good night’s sleep” is another. We now know that both of these conceptions may not be correct.

The blending of various specialities into what we now know as sleep medicine has been an interesting journey. Neurologists began to investigate sleep, and what they uncovered at night was amazing. During the “silent” hours of sleep, abnormalities in breathing would scare even the most aggressive physician.1 Not long after, an article appeared in the British literature linking snoring to stroke, and questions began to arise as to the possible association.2

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snoring ; sleep

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