0
Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease |

Bronchial Responsiveness to Eucapnic Hyperventilation and Methacholine Following Exposure to Organic Dust*

Britt-Marie Sundblad, BSc; Lena Palmberg, MD, PhD; Kjell Larsson, MD, PhD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Program for Respiratory Health and Climate, National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm, Sweden.

Correspondence to: Britt-Marie Sundblad, BSc, Program for Respiratory Health and Climate, National Institute for Working Life, S-11279 Stockholm, Sweden; e-mail: Britt-Marie.Sundblad@niwl.se



Chest. 2002;122(1):363-368. doi:10.1378/chest.122.1.363
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objective: Inhalation of dust in a swine confinement building causes an intense airway inflammatory reaction in the airways and increased bronchial responsiveness to methacholine. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether exposure to organic dust also influences bronchial responsiveness to an indirect stimulus, and to assess the duration of increased postexposure bronchial responsiveness.

Design: Twenty-two healthy nonatopic, nonsmoking subjects were exposed to dust for 3 h in a swine confinement building. Lung function was assessed, and either a methacholine bronchial provocation (n = 11) or a challenge with eucapnic hyperventilation of dry air (n = 11) was performed before exposure and at 7 h, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after exposure.

Results: Vital capacity and FEV1 decreased 3% and 6%, respectively (p < 0.001), and airway resistance increased 15% (p < 0.05) after exposure. The median provocative dose of methacholine causing a 20% decline in FEV1 fell from 1.38 mg (25th to 75th percentiles, 0.75 to 7.20 mg) before exposure to 0.18 mg (0.11 to 0.30 mg) after exposure (p = 0.004). Corresponding values for the dose-response slope were 15.3%/mg (2.88 to 25.3%/mg) and 100.2%/mg (2.1 to 27.3%/mg), respectively (p = 0.01). Bronchial responsiveness to eucapnic hyperventilation was not affected by the exposure: FEV1 fell 4.3% (− 7.2 to − 1.8%) before and 4.8% (− 6.7 to − 1.6%) after exposure (p = 0.72). One week after exposure, the bronchial responsiveness to methacholine was normalized.

Conclusions: The bronchial responsiveness to methacholine but not to dry air increases after exposure to swine house dust. Thus, exposure to organic dust induces increased bronchial responsiveness with different characteristics from that frequently found in asthma.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543