0
Occupational and Environmental Lung Disease |

Use of Specific Inhalation Challenge in the Evaluation of Workers at Risk for Occupational Asthma*: A Survey of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Occupational Medicine Residency Training Programs in the United States and Canada

Hector G. Ortega, MD, ScD; David N. Weissman, MD; Deanna L. Carter; Daniel Banks, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Medicine (Ms. Carter and Dr. Banks), Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown; and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (Drs. Ortega and Weissman), Morgantown, WV.

Correspondence to: Hector G. Ortega, MD, ScD, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Division of Lung Diseases, Two Rockledge Centre, 6701 Rockledge Dr, Ste 10018, Bethesda, MD 20892-7952



Chest. 2002;121(4):1323-1328. doi:10.1378/chest.121.4.1323
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: To document the current practice of occupational asthma (OA) diagnosis and use of specific inhalation challenge (SIC).

Design, setting, and participants: A survey evaluating the current practice of SIC was mailed to 259 residency training programs in adult pulmonary diseases, allergy and immunology, and occupational medicine accredited in the United States and Canada during the year 2000.

Results: Forty-six percent (123 of 259 programs) participated. Ninety-two programs reported that patients with OA were seen during the previous year, 15 programs reported that SIC had been performed, and 10 programs reported that patients had been referred to other sites for SIC. A total of 259 patients underwent SIC. No unexpected adverse reactions were reported. Forty-one programs reported that they had been willing to undertake SIC but were unable to do so. The most common barriers cited were lack of availability of SIC within the evaluating institution, inability to locate a site for referral, concerns about reimbursement, and lack of an appropriate diagnostic reagent for use in SIC. Seventy-four programs indicated that SIC was useful, and 34 programs included training in the use of SIC was part of the residency curriculum.

Conclusion: Although SIC is considered the “gold standard” for objective documentation of OA, the test is performed in only a few institutions in the United States and Canada. Many institutions indicate that SIC is not available, even when desired for patient management. Only a minority of participating residency training programs include SIC as a formal part of the training curriculum.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543