0
Articles |

Partial Pneumonectomy Enhances Melanoma Metastasis to Mouse Lungs*

Lynn M. Brown, PhD; Danny R. Welch, PhD; D. Eugene Rannels, PhD; Stephen R. Rannels, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.

Correspondence to: D. Eugene Rannels, PhD, Department of Cellular & Molecular Physiology, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033; e-mail: grannels@psu.edu



Chest. 2002;121(3_suppl):28S-29S. doi:10.1378/chest.121.3_suppl.28S-a
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

Tumor cell metastasis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality associated with cancer. An improved understanding of the physiologic events that modulate metastases is needed to identify and employ effective treatments. Tissue growth can stimulate metastasis, markedly increasing both tumor incidence and multiplicity. In small mammals, left pneumonectomy (PNX) initiates rapid compensatory hyperplasia of the remnant lung lobes, which restores normal tissue mass, structure, and function. Our previous work1 demonstrated that PNX promotes pulmonary adenoma formation in carcinogen-treated mice. The present study tests the hypothesis that PNX enhances experimental metastasis to the lung. A left PNX or sham surgery was performed on syngeneic C57BL/6 mice at intervals prior to the IV injection of 5 × 104 B16F10 melanoma cells. Two weeks after injection, the animals were killed and the number of pulmonary melanoma metastases were enumerated. In control animals, the mean (± SEM) number of tumors ranged from 56 ± 8 to 105 ± 14. In mice that had been subjected to PNX 1 to 7 days prior to B16F10 cell injection, the mean tumor number ranged from 150 ± 22 to 235 ± 27, an increase of 77 to 260% over controls (p < 0.01). The largest difference was observed between day-5 groups, in which PNX mice had 3.6-fold more metastatic tumors than controls. Moreover, measurements of the tumor area revealed that PNX mice harbored a substantially larger lung tumor burden than did control animals. PNX had no effect on the growth of subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors, suggesting that experimental melanoma metastasis was enhanced by local conditions associated with rapid lung growth. Because the lung is a frequent site for metastatic cancers, these results suggest that PNX is a relevant model in which to investigate the mechanisms that underlie the growth of metastases at a secondary site.

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543