0
Clinical Investigations: HYPERSENSITIVITY |

Levels of House Dust Mite-Specific IgE and Cockroach-Specific IgE and Their Association With Lower Pulmonary Function in Taiwanese Children*

Ying-Chu Lin, MSc; Huey-Jen Su, ScD; Tzuen-Ren Hsiue, MD; Cheng-Hung Lee, MD; Chang-Wen Chen, MD; Yueliang Leon Guo, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health (Mr. Lin, and Drs. Su and Guo), and the Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine (Drs. Hsiue, Lee, and Chen), National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.

Correspondence to: Yueliang Leon Guo, MD, PhD, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University, 138 Sheng-Li Road, Tainan, Taiwan 704; e-mail: leonguo@mail.ncku.edu.tw



Chest. 2002;121(2):347-353. doi:10.1378/chest.121.2.347
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objective: Sensitization to an aeroallergen is known to diminish pulmonary function in young children and adults; however, it remains unclear whether it produces similar effects in adolescents. This study, therefore, examined the relationship between serum allergen-specific IgE levels and pulmonary function in adolescents.

Design: Middle-school children were invited for a physician’s evaluation and pulmonary function test when not experiencing an asthma attack and for the determination of serum levels of specific IgE to common allergens.

Setting: National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Taiwan.

Subjects: Middle-school children in southern Taiwan, who had completed both a nationally administered Chinese version of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire and a pulmonary function test in October 1996.

Results: Forty-two then currently asthmatic children, 38 children with asthma in remission (no reported attack for > 12 months), and 69 children without asthma completed the study. Children with asthma had a significantly lower adjusted forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC (FEF25–75%) and FEV1/FVC than children without asthma. A greater percentage of children with asthma were more sensitized to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p), Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f), and German cockroach but not cat dander or dog dander. Children with asthma with Der f-specific IgE > 100 IU/mL, or cockroach-specific IgE > 0.7 IU/mL showed lower pulmonary function. No such association was found in children without asthma.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that sensitization to Der f and German cockroach was a critical factor for the lower pulmonary function observed in middle-school children with asthma.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543