0
Selected Reports |

Pulmonary Edema Caused by Inhaled Nitric Oxide Therapy in Two Patients With Pulmonary Hypertension Associated With the CREST Syndrome*

Ioana R. Preston, MD; James R. Klinger, MD, FCCP; Jeanne Houtchens, BS, RN; David Nelson, CRT; Sangeeta Mehta, MD; Nicholas S. Hill, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital and Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, RI.

Corresponding to: Nicholas S. Hill, MD, FCCP, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, 593 Eddy St, Providence, RI 02903; e-mail: Nicholas_Hill@Brown.edu



Chest. 2002;121(2):656-659. doi:10.1378/chest.121.2.656
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is commonly associated with the CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia) syndrome. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is often used to assess acute vasoresponsiveness in patients with PAH, and reports of adverse reactions have been infrequent. We describe two of nine patients with PAH and CREST syndrome who had pulmonary edema develop during acute iNO testing. This complication was not encountered in the 46 patients with other forms of PAH tested with iNO. We suggest that iNO should be used with caution, if at all, to test acute vasoreactivity in patients with CREST syndrome.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543