0
Clinical Investigations: SLEEP AND BREATHING |

What Are Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Being Treated for Prior to This Diagnosis?*

Robert Smith, MD; John Ronald, MD; Kenneth Delaive, BSc; Randy Walld, BSc; Jure Manfreda, MD; Meir H. Kryger, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Sleep Disorders Center (Drs. Smith, Ronald, and Kryger, and Mr. Delaive), St. Boniface General Hospital Research Center; and the Center for Health Policy and Evaluation (Dr. Manfreda and Mr. Walld), Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Correspondence to: Meir H. Kryger, MD, FCCP, Sleep Disorders Center, St. Boniface General Hospital, R2034, 351 Tache Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R2H 2A6; e-mail: kryger@sleep. umanitoba.ca



Chest. 2002;121(1):164-172. doi:10.1378/chest.121.1.164
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) use health-care resources at higher rates than control subjects for years prior to diagnosis. Although obesity and certain cardiovascular disorders are more common in OSAS patients, the precise cause of increased health-care utilization is unclear.

Objectives: To examine the causes of increased utilization, and what patients with OSAS were being treated for prior to this diagnosis.

Methods: We compared the records of 773 patients with OSAS to those of age-, gender-, geographic-, and physician-matched control subjects from the general population.

Results: We found that sleep apnea patients used 23 to 50% more resources (defined by physician fees, physician visits, and hospital nights) in the 5 years prior to diagnosis than did control subjects. We examined the diagnoses made and found that apnea patients are at higher risk for hypertension (odds ratio [OR], 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0 to 3.3), congestive heart failure (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.7 to 8.9), cardiac arrhythmias (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.0), cardiovascular disease (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.0 to 3.3), chronic obstructive airways disease (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2 to 2.0), and depression (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0 to 1.9). To control for the confounding effects of obesity and to determine the independent effects of body mass index (BMI), gender, age, degree of hypoxemia, apnea-hypopnea index, and sleepiness in the 773 patients, we performed a logistic regression analysis with the dependent variable being diagnosis, and a linear regression analysis with the dependent variable being measures of health-care utilization. Age and BMI were significant independent predictors of most cardiovascular diagnoses and arthropathy. Male gender predicted ischemic heart disease (OR, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.36 to 6.54), and female gender was predictive of chronic obstructive airways disease (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.85 to 3.72) and depression (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.45 to 3.44). The best model predicting health-care utilization measures was comprised of age, gender, and BMI, and explained 9%, 14%, and 8% of the variability in physician fees, number of physician claims, and number of physician visits, respectively.

Conclusion: Of all comorbid diagnoses, significantly increased utilization was found for cardiovascular disease and especially hypertension in the OSAS patients.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543