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Clinical Investigations: FUNGUS |

Chronic Necrotizing Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Pneumoconiosis*: Clinical and Radiologic Findings in 10 Patients

Takashi Kato, MD; Ikuji Usami, MD; Hiroki Morita, MD; Masahiro Goto, MD; Masayoshi Hosoda, MD; Atsushi Nakamura, MD; Shogo Shima, MD
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: *From the Department of Internal Medicine (Drs. Kato, Usami, Morita, and Goto), Asahi Rosai Hospital, Aichi; the First Department of Internal Medicine (Drs. Hosoda and Nakamura), Nagoya City University Medical School, Nagoya; and Aichi Occupational Health Promotion Center (Dr. Shima), Nagoya, Japan. ,  Currently at the First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagoya City University Medical School.

Correspondence to: Takashi Kato, MD, First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagoya City University Medical School, Kawasumi 1, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8602, Japan; e-mail: takakato@sunprom.med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp



Chest. 2002;121(1):118-127. doi:10.1378/chest.121.1.118
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Study objective: To characterize clinical, radiographic, and CT findings of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA) in patients with pneumoconiosis.

Methods: We studied 10 patients with pneumoconiosis who were seen at Asahi Rosai Hospital and received a clinical diagnosis of CNPA during a 15-year period, and detailed the long-term clinical and radiologic courses of four cases.

Results: All patients were men, ranging in age from 48 to 77 years (mean, 60.1 years). Their occupational histories included pottery making (n = 9) and coal mining (n = 1). Chest radiographic findings by the International Labor Organization profusion grading system were greater than category 2. All patients were symptomatic, with a productive cough, hemoptysis, and dyspnea. Serum findings were positive for the Aspergillus antibody in seven patients. The radiologic findings consisted of parenchymal infiltrates and cavities mostly containing mycetoma, which generally involved the upper lobes. The disease progressed slowly; in one patient, broad destruction of the lung was observed after > 10 years without antifungal administration. Most of the patients experienced clinical and radiologic improvement after receiving antifungal therapy, by oral, inhaled, or intracavitary administration.

Conclusions: Chronic persistent or progressive upper-lobe infiltrates and cavities in patients with pneumoconiosis should raise the possibility of CNPA. Early diagnosis and initiation of effective therapy are recommended to achieve a better outcome.

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