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Clinical Investigations: CARDIOLOGY |

Clinical Significance of Coronary Flow to the Infarct Zone Before Successful Primary Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty in Acute Myocardial Infarction*

Kengo Hatada, MD; Tetsuro Sugiura, MD, FCCP; Hiroshi Kamihata, MD; Seishi Nakamura, MD; Nobuyuki Takahashi, MD; Fumio Yuasa, MD; Toshiji Iwasaka, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Cardiovascular Division (Drs. Hatada, Kamihata, Nakamura, Takahashi, Yuasa, and Iwasaka), Second Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, Japan; and the Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine (Dr. Sugiura), Kochi Medical School, Kochi, Japan.

Correspondence to: Kengo Hatada MD, CCU, Kansai Medical University Hospital, 10–15 Fumizono-cho, Moriguchi-City, Osaka 570-8507, Japan; e-mail: hatada@takii.kmu.ac.jp



Chest. 2001;120(6):1959-1963. doi:10.1378/chest.120.6.1959
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Study objective: To assess the effect of coronary flow to the infarct zone before primary coronary angioplasty on hospital complications in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI).

Design: Consecutive case series analysis.

Setting: Coronary-care unit in a university hospital.

Patients: Two hundred sixty-four consecutive patients with ST-elevation acute MIs who had successful primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

Interventions: Coronary angiography on hospital admission and serial echocardiography.

Measurements and results: The status of infarct-related artery flow before primary angioplasty was evaluated on hospital admission. Left ventricular wall motion and pericardial effusions were studied by echocardiography. One hundred ninety patients had total occlusions (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction [TIMI] flow grade, 0 to 1) in the infarct-related artery (group 1), and 74 patients had antegrade flow (TIMI flow grade, 2 to 3) [group 2] before undergoing primary angioplasty procedures. When group 1 was subdivided into two groups (for the presence and absence of collateral flow), the patients with total occlusions and no collateral flow had a higher incidence of left ventricular aneurysmal wall motion (11% vs 1%, respectively; p = 0.03) and pericardial friction rub (15% vs 3%, respectively; p = 0.03) than did those in group 2. Moreover, those patients with total occlusions and no collateral flow had higher incidences of pericardial effusion (34% vs 17%, respectively; p = 0.02; and 34% vs 9%, respectively; p < 0.01) and in-hospital mortality (8% vs 1%, respectively; p = 0.04; and 8% vs 1%, respectively; p = 0.06) than did those patients in the other two groups.

Conclusions: Despite successful primary angioplasty, the absence of antegrade flow in the infarct-related artery and collateral flow to the infarct zone before angioplasty resulted in a higher incidence of in-hospital complications.


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