0
Clinical Investigations: SURGERY |

Symptom-Limited Stair Climbing as a Predictor of Postoperative Cardiopulmonary Complications After High-Risk Surgery*

Mirle Girish, MD; Edwin Trayner, Jr, MD, FCCP; Olaf Dammann, MD, MS; Victor Pinto-Plata, MD; Bartolome Celli, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Drs. Girish, Trayner, Pinto-Plata, and Celli), Department of Medicine, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; and Department of Pediatrics (Dr. Dammann), Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA.

Correspondence to: Edwin M. Trayner, Jr, MD, FCCP, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center, 736 Cambridge St, Boston, MA 02135



Chest. 2001;120(4):1147-1151. doi:10.1378/chest.120.4.1147
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objective: Thoracotomy, sternotomy, and upper abdominal laparotomy are associated with high rate of postoperative cardiopulmonary complications (POCs). We hypothesized that symptom-limited stair climbing predicts POCs after high-risk surgery.

Design: A prospective evaluation of 83 patients undergoing thoracotomy, sternotomy, and upper abdominal laparotomy surgery.

Methods: The 52 men and 31 women completed symptom-limited stair climbing. A separate investigator, blinded to the number of flights of stairs climbed, assessed 30-day actual outcomes for POCs, including pneumonia, atelectasis, mechanical ventilation for > 48 h, reintubation, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, pulmonary embolus, and death within 30 days of surgery. The operations performed included 31 lobectomies, 6 wedge resections, 3 pneumonectomies, 3 substernal thymectomies, 1 substernal thyroidectomy, 23 colectomies, 3 laparotomies, 7 abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs, 5 esophagogastrectomies, and 1 nephrectomy.

Results: POCs occurred in 21 of 83 patients (25%) overall, in 9 of 44 patients undergoing thoracotomy/sternotomy (20%), and in 12 of 39 patients undergoing upper abdominal laparotomy (31%). Of those unable to climb one flight of stairs, 89% developed a POC. No patient able to climb the maximum of seven flights of stairs had a POC. The inability to climb two flights of stairs was associated with a positive predictive value of 82% for the development of a POC. The number of days in the hospital postoperatively decreased with a patient’s increased ability to climb stairs.

Conclusions: Symptom-limited stair climbing offers a simple, inexpensive means to predict POCs after high-risk surgery.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543