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Predicting Extubation Failure : Is It in (on) the Cards?

Scott K. Epstein, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Boston, MA 
 ,  Dr. Epstein is Associate Director, Medical Intensive Care Unit, Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, New England Medical Center, Associate Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.

Correspondence to: Scott K. Epstein, MD, FCCP, Box 369, New England Medical Center, 750 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111; e-mail: SEpstein@lifespan.org



Chest. 2001;120(4):1061-1063. doi:10.1378/chest.120.4.1061
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Extract

Determining readiness for liberation from mechanical ventilation (weaning) and the optimal technique to facilitate the process for patients who prove more difficult to wean is of considerable clinical relevance. Yet, once mechanical ventilation is no longer required, the clinician must address the separate question of whether or not the patient can tolerate removal of the endotracheal tube (eg, extubation). The process and outcome of extubation has received increasing attention among clinical investigators. Recent work clearly demonstrates that liberation and extubation are discrete processes with distinct pathophysiologic causes and unique outcomes.

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