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Clinical Investigations: CARDIOLOGY |

Angiographic and Prognostic Correlates of Cardiac Output by Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Patients With Anterior Myocardial Infarction*

Riccardo Bigi, MD; Alessandro Desideri, MD; Riccardo Rambaldi, MD, PhD; Lauro Cortigiani, MD; Carlo Sponzilli, MD; Cesare Fiorentini, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (Drs. Bigi, Desideri, and Cortigiani), “S. Giacomo” Hospital, Castelfranco Veneto, Italy; and Division of Cardiology (Drs. Rambaldi and Sponzilli), “S. Paolo” Hospital; The Institute of Biomedical Sciences (Dr. Fiorentini), University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

Correspondence to: Riccardo Bigi, MD, via Visoli, 1, 23037 Tirano (SO), Italy; e-mail: rbigi@tiscalinet.it



Chest. 2001;120(3):825-833. doi:10.1378/chest.120.3.825
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Study objective: To assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of cardiac output assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing in patients with anterior acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and left ventricular dysfunction.

Patients and setting: Forty-six patients with AMI (7 female patients; mean ± SD age, 55 ± 8 years; ejection fraction, 39 ± 7%) underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and coronary angiography following hospital discharge.

Measurement and results: Cardiac output was estimated from oxygen uptake (V̇o2) during exercise according to a method based on the linear regression between arteriovenous oxygen content difference and percent maximum V̇o2. Angiograms were scored using Gensini and Duke “jeopardy” scores. Cardiac output at anaerobic threshold (COat) ≤ 7.3 L/min was the best cutoff value for identifying multivessel coronary artery disease (relative risk, 3.1). Angiographic scores were significantly higher in patients with COat < 7.3 L/min as compared to those with COat > 7.3 L/min (82 ± 8 vs 53 ± 7 and 6 ± 2 vs 4 ± 3, respectively; p < 0.05) and were inversely and significantly correlated to COat. Conversely, no correlation was found with ECG changes. COat,o2 at anaerobic threshold, and peak V̇o2 were univariate prognostic indicators. However, using Cox’s model, COat was the only multivariate predictor of outcome (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.09 to 0.9). Moreover, COat < 7.3 L/min was associated to an increased risk of further cardiac events (odds ratio, 5; 95% CI, 1.4 to 17) and provided a significant discrimination of survival for the combined end point of cardiac death, reinfarction, and clinically driven revascularization.

Conclusions: COat is a safe and feasible tool providing additional diagnostic and prognostic information in patients with AMI.

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