0
Clinical Investigations: CANCER |

Pulmonary Carcinoid*: Presentation, Diagnosis, and Outcome in 142 Cases in Israel and Review of 640 Cases From the Literature

Gershon Fink, MD; Tali Krelbaum, MD; Alon Yellin, MD; Daniel Bendayan, MD; Milton Saute, MD; Mendel Glazer, MD; Mordechai R. Kramer, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Pulmonology Institute (Drs. Fink, Krelbaum, Bendayan, and Kramer), Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tiqva; the Department of Thoracic Surgery (Dr. Yellin), Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer; Carmel Medical Center (Dr. Saute), Haifa; and the Pulmonary Institute, Hadassah University Hospital (Dr. Glazer), Jerusalem, Israel.

Correspondence to: Mordechai R. Kramer, MD, FCCP, Pulmonology Institute, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tiqva 49100, Israel; e-mail: pulm@netvision.net.il



Chest. 2001;119(6):1647-1651. doi:10.1378/chest.119.6.1647
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objective: To determine the characteristic features and outcome of pulmonary carcinoid tumors in Israel.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of the clinicopathologic data and outcome of patients from four major hospitals in Israel in the last 20 years.

Results: There were 142 cases of pulmonary carcinoid tumors: typical (n = 128) and atypical (n = 14). We calculated an annual incidence of about 2.3 to 2.8 cases per 1 million population. The ratio of female to male patients was 1.6:1. The prevalence of smoking was similar to the general population in patients with typical carcinoids and twice as high in the atypical group. Bronchial obstruction was the cause of most of the presenting symptoms and signs and included obstructive pneumonitis, pleuritic pain, atelectasis, and dyspnea (41%). Carcinoid syndrome was extremely rare and occurred in only one patient with metastatic disease. Most of the tumors (68%) arose in the major bronchi. Diagnosis was made using fiberoptic bronchoscopy in 52% of patients without evidence of endobronchial hemorrhage. Nodal involvement and distant metastases occurred in 57% and 21%, respectively, in the atypical group, and 10% and 3%, respectively, in the typical group. The treatment of choice was surgical: lobectomy (56%) or pneumonectomy (16%). The respective 5-year survival rates for patients with typical and atypical tumors were 89% and 75% (not significant), and the 10-year survival rates were 82% and 56% (p < 0.05). A review of large series from the literature is presented.

Conclusion: Pulmonary carcinoid is an uncommon tumor in the Israeli population. With early diagnosis and aggressive surgical therapy, long-term prognosis is excellent.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543