0
Clinical Investigations: ASTHMA |

The Prevalence of Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm Among US Army Recruits and Its Effects on Physical Performance*

Larry A. Sonna, MD, PhD; Karen C. Angel, MS; Marilyn A. Sharp, MS; Joseph J. Knapik, ScD; John F. Patton, PhD; Craig M. Lilly, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (Drs. Sonna and Patton, and Mss. Angel and Sharp), Natick, MA; US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (Dr. Knapik), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, MD; and Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Dr. Lilly), Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Correspondence to: Larry A. Sonna, MD, PhD, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, 42 Kansas St, Natick, MA 01760; e-mail: larry.sonna@na.amedd.army.mil



Chest. 2001;119(6):1676-1684. doi:10.1378/chest.119.6.1676
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: To measure the prevalence of exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) and to determine its effect on the physical performance response to training in otherwise healthy young adults.

Design: Observational, retrospective study.

Setting: Fort Jackson, SC, May to July 1998.

Participants: One hundred thirty-seven ethnically diverse US Army recruits undergoing an 8-week Army basic training course.

Measurements and results: Subjects underwent exercise challenge testing at the end of basic training to evaluate for EIB (defined as a decrease in FEV1 of≥ 15%, 1 or 10 min after running to peak oxygen uptake on a treadmill). Those subjects who were unable to run to peak oxygen uptake, or who were unable to perform two baseline FEV1 maneuvers the results of which were within 5% of each other, were excluded from analysis. We measured peak oxygen uptake on a treadmill and the scores achieved on the components of the US Army physical fitness test (APFT). Of 137 subjects, 121 (58 men and 63 women) met our inclusion criteria. Eight subjects (7%) had EIB. Subjects who experienced EIB and unaffected control subjects both showed statistically significant gains in performance on the APFT events during basic training. At the end of basic training, peak oxygen uptake levels and APFT event scores were not significantly different between subjects with EIB and unaffected control subjects.

Conclusions: Seven percent of the US Army recruits who were tested had EIB, but this did not hinder their physical performance gains during basic training. EIB per se should not be an absolute reason to exclude individuals from employment in jobs with heavy physical demands.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543