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What Outcomes Should Be Measured in Patients With COPD?

Roger D. Yusen, MD
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: St. Louis, MO 
 ,  Dr. Yusen is Assistant Professor of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine.

Correspondence to: Roger D. Yusen, MD, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8052, 660 S. Euclid Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110; email: yusenr@msnotes.wustl.edu



Chest. 2001;119(2):327-328. doi:10.1378/chest.119.2.327
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Extract

Traditionally, pulmonary physicians rely on measures of lung function to diagnose, to assess disease severity, and to determine response to therapy in patients with COPD. The FEV1 has been used as the main outcome in many clinical studies. Survival has been the main end point in several clinical trials for COPD, but only a few interventions (eg, administration of supplemental oxygen to hypoxemic patients) have been demonstrated to improve survival. However, the bulk of therapy for COPD has been aimed at improving quality of life. Many clinical studies of patients with COPD have not used quality-of-life measures as outcomes.

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