0
Clinical Investigations: ASTHMA |

The Relation Between Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Counts and Respiratory Symptoms, Atopy, Lung Function, and Airway Responsiveness in Adults*

Sarah A. Lewis, PhD; Ian D. Pavord, MD; John R. Stringer, FIBMS; Alan J. Knox, MD; Scott T. Weiss, MD, FCCP; John R. Britton, MD, MSc
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Respiratory Medicine (Drs. Lewis, Knox, and Britton, and Mr. Stringer), City Hospital, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; Department of Respiratory Medicine (Dr. Pavord), Glenfield Hospital, Leicester, UK; and Channing Laboratory (Dr. Weiss), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA.

Correspondence to: Sarah A. Lewis, PhD, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Clinical Sciences Building, City Hospital, Nottingham, UK NG5 1PB



Chest. 2001;119(1):105-114. doi:10.1378/chest.119.1.105
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: Eosinophils and neutrophils play major roles, respectively, in the pathogenesis of asthma and COPD, and it is well recognized that levels of these cells in peripheral blood are increased in relation to their pulmonary involvement. However, the relation between peripheral blood cell counts of the other major leukocyte groups and these lung diseases or markers of allergy or airflow obstruction is less clear. We have therefore investigated the association between peripheral blood levels of eosinophils, neutrophils, basophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes and the occurrence of chronic respiratory symptoms, atopy, lung function, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and the modifying effect of age, in adults.

Design: A cross-sectional general population study.

Setting: Data on > 2,000 British adults, who originally participated in a study of diet and lung health, were analyzed using multiple linear and logistic regression to adjust for potential confounders, including age, sex, and smoking history.

Results: We found that, like eosinophils, the peripheral basophil count was increased in relation to asthma and associated symptoms, and to airway hyperreactivity and increased total IgE, but differed from eosinophils in that basophils were unrelated to atopy. Monocytes were predominantly associated with symptoms indicative of obstructive airway disease, in similar relation to neutrophils, but both of these leukocyte counts were also increased in asthma patients in older age groups. Lymphocyte counts were unrelated to any objective or subjective marker of disease.

Conclusions: If peripheral blood cell counts reflect pulmonary involvement of these leukocyte groups, basophils and monocytes may play a distinct role in the pathogenesis of allergic and nonallergic respiratory disease.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
Measuring Exhaled Nitric Oxide Levels in Adults*: The Importance of Atopy and Airway Responsiveness
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543