0
Editorials |

Pulmonary Injury After Cardiopulmonary Bypass

Vincent R. Conti, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: Galveston, TX 
 ,  Dr. Conti is Professor and Chief, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, The University of Texas Medical Branch.

Correspondence to: Vincent R. Conti, MD, FCCP, The University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd, Galveston, TX 77555-0528; e-mail: vconti@utmb.edu



Chest. 2001;119(1):2-4. doi:10.1378/chest.119.1.2
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

It has been known since the early experience with cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass that significant pulmonary injury may follow these operations and can cause significant mortality and morbidity. The pulmonary injury, colloquially referred to as“ pump lung,” was recognized early on to be a problem of increased microvascular permeability, since the pulmonary edema and hypoxemia with increased alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient occurred in the presence of relatively low directly measured left atrial pressure, a value that was then rarely available to the clinician except early after cardiac surgery. It has since become clear that the clinical features and pathophysiology of pulmonary injury associated with cardiopulmonary bypass is nearly identical to ARDS associated with other etiologies. Indeed, the lung injury is only a part of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) that is probably activated to a variable degree in all patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass1 and perhaps even those undergoing major operations without bypass.2

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543