0
Clinical Investigations: ASTHMA |

Asthmatic Subjects Symptomatically Worse at Work*: Prevalence and Characterization Among a General Asthma Clinic Population

Susan M. Tarlo, MBBS, FCCP; Kevin Leung, MD; Irvin Broder, MD; Frances Silverman, PhD; D. Linn Holness, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Gage Occupational and Environmental Health Unit, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Correspondence to: Susan M. Tarlo, MBBS, FCCP, Gage Occupational and Environmental Health Unit, 223 College St, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R4, Canada; e-mail: susan.tarlo@utoronto.ca



Chest. 2000;118(5):1309-1314. doi:10.1378/chest.118.5.1309
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: To assess the prevalence of a historical occupational component to asthma in an adult asthma clinic and to compare characteristics of asthmatic subjects with and without work-attributed symptoms.

Design: A retrospective review of data obtained from a physician-administered questionnaire, answers to which were obtained at the initial patient visit of asthmatic subjects, and which included specific questions regarding the relationship of work to symptoms. Chart review data were used to supplement information on workplace exposures and investigations.

Setting: A university-based secondary- and tertiary-referral asthma clinic.

Patients: Seven hundred thirty-one adult asthmatic subjects who were referred for assessment and management of asthma.

Interventions: Statistical analyses of asthmatic subjects with and without work-attributed symptoms and a determination, from chart review, of the likelihood of causes for symptomatic worsening of asthma at work.

Measurements and results: Sixty percent of the patients (435) had adult onset of asthma, among whom 310 patients (71%) were employed at the time of their visit. Fifty-one patients reported their asthma to be worse at work (ie, 16% of adult-onset working asthmatic subjects). Sixteen of these patients (31%) had likely or possible sensitizer-induced occupational asthma (OA), and 49% likely had aggravation of underlying asthma. The other 20% of patients had possible OA or aggravation of underlying asthma at work.

Conclusions: Adult-onset asthmatic subjects commonly report a worsening of asthma at work, more commonly on the basis of likely aggravation of underlying asthma than on the basis of likely or possible OA.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Topics

asthma

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543