0
Clinical Investigations: COPD |

Oxygen Supplementation and Cardiac-Autonomic Modulation in COPD*

Matthew N. Bartels, MD, MPH; John M. Gonzalez, BS; Woojin Kim, BS; Ronald E. De Meersman, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Human Performance Laboratory, Presbyterian Hospital of the New-York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY; and the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, NY.

Correspondence to: Matthew N. Bartels, MD, MPH, 180 Fort Washington Ave, Harkness Pavilion, Room 184, Suite 199, New York, NY 10032; e-mail: mnb4@columbia.edu



Chest. 2000;118(3):691-696. doi:10.1378/chest.118.3.691
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: Patients with COPD have an increased sympathetic modulation and reduced baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Therefore, we studied the effects of breathing 31% supplemental oxygen (SuppO2) on autonomic modulation in a group of COPD patients.

Design: We measured autonomic modulation before and during the administration of SuppO2 on 51 patients with COPD using time-frequency analysis of R-R intervals and BP before and after intervention. This was done via a counterbalanced crossover design. The BRS index was determined using the sequence method.

Results: Significant differences were seen in oxygen saturation levels following breathing with SuppO2 ([mean ± SD] 96.4 ± 1.5%) when compared to those seen after breathing with compressed air (CA) (92.8 ± 2.9%; p < 0.0001). Significant increases were seen in the natural log-transformed high-frequency modulation (HFln) (SuppO2, 10.8 ± 1.3 natural logarithm [ln] ms2/Hz; CA, 10.6 ± 1.3 ln ms2/Hz; p < 0.028) and BRS (SuppO2, 3.3 ± 2.2 ms/mm Hg; CA, 2.8 ± 1.8 ms/mm Hg) following the supplemental oxygen treatment (p < 0.015). The low-frequency/high-frequency ratio of heart rate variability revealed significant differences between the two treatments (SuppO2, 2.7 ± 1.2; CA, 3.1 ± 1.3; p < 0.008). The analysis of BP variability data revealed significant decreases in the HFln (CA, 6.9 ± 1.0 mm Hg2/Hz; SuppO2, 6.5 ± 1.2 mm Hg2/Hz; p < 0.0001). Hemodynamic data also revealed a decrease in mean heart rate after breathing SuppO2 compared with that after breathing CA (CA, 87.3 ± 13.3 beats/min; SuppO2, 85.0 ± 12.4 beats/min; p < 0.0004). The arterial pulse pressure significantly decreased when breathing SuppO2 compared with that when breathing CA (CA, 57.2 ± 13.5 mm Hg; SuppO2, 53.3 ± 13.0 mm Hg; p < 0.0023).

Conclusion: Oxygen supplementation in COPD patients significantly and favorably alters autonomic modulation.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543