0
Clinical Investigations: PULMONARY VASCULATURE |

Plasma Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Acute Mountain Sickness*

James Maloney, MD; Dale Wang, MD; Timothy Duncan, MD; Norbert Voelkel, MD; Stephen Ruoss, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (Dr. Maloney), Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI; University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (Dr. Voelkel), Denver, CO; Stanford University (Dr. Ruoss), Palo Alto, CA; Boulder Community Hospital (Dr. Wang), Boulder, CO; and St. Clare’s Hospital (Dr. Duncan), Tacoma, WA.

Correspondence to: James P. Maloney, MD, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 9200 W. Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53226; e-mail: jmaloney@mcw.edu



Chest. 2000;118(1):47-52. doi:10.1378/chest.118.1.47
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: To investigate the hypothesis that an increase in circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) occurs in mountaineers at high altitude, particularly in association with acute mountain sickness (AMS) and/or low hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

Design: Collection of medical histories, AMS scores, plasma samples, and arterial oxygen saturation (Sao2) measurements from mountaineers at 1,500 feet (sea level) and at 14,200 feet.

Setting: Mount McKinley (“Denali”), AK.

Participants: Sixty-six mountaineers.

Interventions: None.

Measurements and results: Plasma VEGF at 14,200 feet was not increased in any group. In fact, plasma VEGF was significantly lower in subjects who did not develop AMS (53 ± 7.9 pg/mL; mean ± SEM; n = 47) compared to control subjects at sea level (98.4 ± 14.3 pg/mL; n = 7; p = 0.005). Plasma VEGF at 14,200 feet for subjects with AMS (62 ± 12 pg/mL; n = 15) did not differ significantly from subjects at 14,200 feet without AMS, or from control subjects at sea level. Of a small number of subjects with paired specimens at sea level and at base camp (n = 5), subjects who exhibited a decrease in plasma VEGF at 14,200 feet were those who did not develop AMS. Neither Sao2, prior AMS, AMS symptom scores, or acetazolamide use were correlated with plasma VEGF.

Conclusions: Subjects at high altitude who do not develop AMS have lower plasma VEGF levels compared to control subjects at sea level. Plasma VEGF at high altitude is not elevated in association with AMS or hypoxia. Sustained plasma VEGF at altitude may reflect a phenotype more susceptible to AMS.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543