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Clinical Investigations: NEBULIZERS |

Is Nebulized Aerosol Treatment Necessary in the Pediatric Emergency Department?*: Comparison With a Metal Spacer Device for Metered-Dose Inhaler

Avigdor Mandelberg, MD; Sharon Tsehori, MD; Sion Houri, MD; Ely Gilad, MD; B. Morag, MD; Israel E. Priel, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Pediatric Pulmonary Unit (Dr. Mandelberg), Department of Pulmonary Medicine (Dr. Priel), Pediatric Emergency Department (Drs. Tsehori and Morag), and Pediatric Critical Care (Drs. Houri and Gilad), Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Correspondence to: Avigdor Mandelberg, MD, Director, Pediatric Pulmonary Unit, The Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Pediatrics, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, 62 Halochamim St, Holon 58100, Israel; e-mail: avigdorm@netvision.net.il



Chest. 2000;117(5):1309-1313. doi:10.1378/chest.117.5.1309
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Background: Infants and small children admitted to the pediatric emergency department (PED) with acute wheezing episodes (AWE) are currently treated with nebulized wet aerosol (NWA).

Objective: To determine the efficacy of MDI with Nebuchamber (Astra AB; Lund, Sweden), a nonelectrostatic spacer device (NESD), as compared to NWA in the treatment of an unselected population of babies and small children with AWE.

Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Forty-two children referred to the PED (median age ± SD, 16 ± 15 months) with AWE received either placebo MDI through a NESD (four puffs) and salbutamol 0.5 mL (2.5 mg) as a NWA (group I, n = 19), or salbutamol MDI and 0.5 mL of saline solution administered in the same manner as above (group II, n = 23). This treatment was repeated three times every 20 min.

Results: The respiratory rates (RRs) at baseline were as follows: group I, 45 ± 11.2 breaths/min; and group II, 52.3 ± 11.3 breaths/min (p = not significant [NS]). After the first, second, and third interventions, the percent fall from baseline of the RR were as follows: group I, 8.9, 13.1, and 17.9%, respectively; group II, 8.6, 14.6, and 18.6%, respectively. There was no significant difference at any time in the results between the two groups. The clinical scores (CSs) at baseline were as follows: group I, 6.6 ± 1.3; group II, 6.8 ± 1.49 (p = NS). After the first, second, and third interventions, the percent fall from baseline of the CS were as follows: group I, 9.1, 17.9, and 23.2%, respectively; group II, 8.6, 18.9, and 24.7%, respectively. These results, also, did not differ significantly at any time between the two groups. Hospitalization rate and side effects did not differ between the two groups.

Conclusions: We conclude that even in the group of unselected very young children (mean age < 2 years) with AWE, the use of MDI with NESD is at least as effective as the use of NWA. As opposed to data from an adult population, no plateau was reached in the dose-response curve using the above doses over time.

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