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Clinical Investigations: SURGERY |

Oxidative Stress After Lung Resection Therapy*: A Pilot Study

Edmée C. Lases, MSc; Vincent A.M. Duurkens, MD; Wim B.M. Gerritsen, MSc; Fred J.L.M. Haas, MSc
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Clinical Chemistry (Drs. Lases, Gerritsen, and Haas) and Pulmonary Diseases (Drs. Duurkens), St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.

Correspondence to: Vincent A.M. Duurkens, MD; Department of Pulmonary Diseases, St. Antonius Hospital, PO Box 2500, NL-3430 EM Nieuwegein, The Netherlands;



Chest. 2000;117(4):999-1003. doi:10.1378/chest.117.4.999
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Study objectives: To investigate whether oxidative stress occurs following lobectomy and pneumonectomy and to evaluate whether markers of oxidative stress might be of value in the assessment of the diagnosis, course, and prognosis of postoperative complications.

Design: A prospective study.

Setting: A specialized thoracic surgical unit in a large referral hospital.

Patients: Twenty-eight patients with lung carcinoma undergoing thoracotomy.

Measurements: Exhaled H2O2 concentrations in breath condensate were measured by spectrophotometry, while malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in urine samples collected every 24 h were measured by reversed-phase, ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography using ultraviolet detection.

Results: Our results show increased H2O2 and MDA levels in lobectomy patients compared with pneumonectomy patients. A strong correlation was found between the levels of H2O2 and MDA.

Conclusion: The present data support the hypothesis that oxidative stress may occur following pulmonary resection.

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