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The Economic Burden of COPD*

Sean D. Sullivan, PhD; Scott D. Ramsey, MD, PhD; Todd A. Lee, PharmD
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*From the Departments of Pharmacy (Drs. Sullivan and Lee), Medicine (Dr. Ramsey), and Health Services (Drs. Sullivan and Ramsey), University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Correspondence to: Sean D. Sullivan, PhD, Department of Pharmacy, Box 357630, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195; e-mail: sdsull@u.washington.edu



Chest. 2000;117(2_suppl):5S-9S. doi:10.1378/chest.117.2_suppl.5S
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COPD is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and imparts a substantial economic burden on individuals and society. Despite the intense interest in COPD among clinicians and researchers, there is a paucity of data on health-care utilization, costs, and social burden in this population. The total economic costs of COPD morbidity and mortality in the United States were estimated at $23.9 billion in 1993. Direct treatments for COPD-related illness accounted for $14.7 billion, and the remaining $9.2 billion were indirect morbidity and premature mortality estimated as lost future earnings. Similar data from another US study suggest that 10% of persons with COPD account for > 70% of all medical care costs. International studies of trends in COPD-related hospitalization indicate that although the average length of stay has decreased since 1972, admissions per 1,000 persons per year for COPD have increased in all age groups > 45 years of age. These trends reflect population aging, smoking patterns, institutional factors, and treatment practices.

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