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Clinical Investigations: LUNG CANCER |

Serum Interleukin-10 Levels as a Prognostic Factor in Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients*

Ferdinando De Vita, MD, PhD; Michele Orditura, MD; Gennaro Galizia, MD; Ciro Romano, MD, PhD; Annarita Roscigno, MD; Eva Lieto, MD; Giuseppe Catalano, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Clinical & Experimental Medicine “F. Magrassi,” Second University of Naples School of Medicine, Naples, Italy

Correspondence to: Ferdinando De Vita, MD, PhD, Chair of Medical Oncology, Department of Clinical & Experimental Medicine “F. Magrassi,” Second University of Naples School of Medicine, Naples, Italy, c/o II Policlinico, Via S. Pansini, 5, 80131 Naples, Italy; e-mail: galizia@unina.it



Chest. 2000;117(2):365-373. doi:10.1378/chest.117.2.365
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Study objective: To investigate the prognostic significance of interleukin (IL)-10 serum levels in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

Design: IL-10 serum levels were measured before chemotherapy, on completion of therapy, and at follow-up by means of a commercially available enzyme-linked immunoassay. The results were then analyzed in comparison with other prognostic variables, and a model predicting overall survival (OS) and time to treatment failure (TTF) was finally generated.

Setting: University hospital.

Patients: Sixty consecutive patients with TNM stage III or IV NSCLC undergoing conventional platinum-based regimens.

Results: Elevated levels of serum IL-10 were found in cancer patients with respect to healthy control subjects (17.7 ± 4.4 vs 9.2 ± 1.5 pg/mL, respectively; p < 0.05), with patients with metastatic disease showing significantly higher levels than patients with undisseminated cancer (21.0 ± 4.2 vs 14.3 ± 1.2 pg/mL, respectively; p < 0.05). Following completion of treatment, patients were classified as responders if they had achieved either one of the following: complete response, partial response, or stable disease; and nonresponders, in case of progressive disease. Retrospective analysis of basal IL-10 serum levels in these two subgroups showed a significant difference between responders and nonresponders (15.2 ± 2.2 vs 21.4 ± 4.2 pg/mL, respectively; p < 0.05). Moreover, a further significant increase in IL-10 serum levels was observed in nonresponders at the end of therapy (21.4 ± 4.2 vs 26.0 ± 4.3 pg/mL, prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy, respectively; p < 0.05), whereas values in responders were found to have significantly decreased (15.2 ± 2.2 vs 14.8 ± 2.2 pg/mL, prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy, respectively; p < 0.05). Using univariate and multivariate analyses, both OS and TTF were shown to be affected by the mean pathologic levels of IL-10. Stepwise regression analysis identified IL-10 serum level and stage as the prognostic factors related to OS, and IL-10 serum level and performance status as the prognostic factors related to TTF.

Conclusions: In conclusion, this study shows that the measurement of pretreatment IL-10 serum levels is of independent prognostic utility in patients with NSCLC and may be useful for detection of disease progression.

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