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Clinical Investigations: BRONCHIECTASIS |

The Effect of Regular Salbutamol on Lung Function and Bronchial Responsiveness in Patients with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia*

Young Yull Koh, MD; Yang Park, MD; Jin Hwa Jeong, MD; Chang Keun Kim, MD; Yang-Gi Min, MD; Je G. Chi, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Pediatrics (Drs. Koh, Park, and Jeong), Otolaryngology (Dr. Min), and Pathology (Dr. Chi), Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea; and the Clinical Research Institute (Drs. Koh, Kim, and Min), Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Correspondence to: Young Yull Koh, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110–744, Korea; e-mail: kohyy@plaza.snu.ac.kr



Chest. 2000;117(2):427-433. doi:10.1378/chest.117.2.427
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Study objective: There is growing evidence that regularβ 2-agonist use in patients with asthma is associated with decreased airway caliber and increased bronchial responsiveness. The aim of this study was to determine whether regular treatment withβ 2-agonists induces changes in lung function and bronchial responsiveness in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

Design: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

Patients: Nineteen children with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

Interventions: Subjects received inhaled salbutamol or identical placebo (2 × 100 μg qid) for periods of 6 weeks with a wash-out period of 4 weeks.

Measurements and results: FEV1 was measured before and 3 weeks and 6 weeks after salbutamol or placebo treatment. High-dose methacholine inhalation tests were performed before and 6 weeks after each treatment. The provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) and maximal airway narrowing (MΔFFEV1) was measured. No significant change in FEV1 was observed during the salbutamol or placebo periods. No significant differences in the parameters of bronchial responsiveness (PC20 and MΔFFEV1) were noted as the result of either salbutamol or placebo treatment.

Conclusion: Our data have shown that salbutamol, inhaled regularly for 6 weeks, did not cause either a decline in lung function or an increase in bronchial responsiveness in subjects with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

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