0
Clinical Investigations: INFECTION |

Intrathoracic Kaposi’s Sarcoma in Women With AIDS*

Linda B. Haramati, MD, FCCP; Julie Wong, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Department of Radiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center and Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY.

Correspondence to: Linda B. Haramati, MD, FCCP, Department of Radiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, 111 East 210th St, Bronx, NY 10467; e-mail: lharamati@aecom.yu.edu



Chest. 2000;117(2):410-414. doi:10.1378/chest.117.2.410
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objective: To describe the radiographic features of intrathoracic Kaposi’s sarcoma in women with AIDS.

Subjects and methods: From 1987 to 1998, we identified seven women with biopsy-proven (n = 4) or autopsy-proven (n = 3) pulmonary Kaposi’s sarcoma. Charts were reviewed for HIV risk factors, cutaneous and/or oropharyngeal Kaposi’s sarcoma, CD4 cell count, and differential diagnosis of pulmonary disease prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary Kaposi’s sarcoma. Chest radiographs (n = 6), chest CT scans (n = 3), and reports of unavailable chest radiograph (n = 1) closest to the time of diagnosis of pulmonary Kaposi’s sarcoma were reviewed for the following: nodular and peribronchovascular opacities; thickened interlobular septa; pleural effusions; lymphadenopathy; and radiographic stage.

Results: Mean patient age was 33 years (range, 27 to 42 years). HIV risk factors were IV drug use (n = 2), heterosexual contact (n = 3), and both (n = 2). All patients had prior opportunistic infections. The median CD4 cell count was 18 /μL (mean, 63/μL; range, 5 to 210/μL). Cutaneous Kaposi’s sarcoma was diagnosed prior to pulmonary Kaposi’s sarcoma in four patients, subsequently in two patients, and not identified in one patient. Oropharyngeal Kaposi’s sarcoma was diagnosed prior to pulmonary Kaposi’s sarcoma in three patients. Only infection was considered in the differential diagnosis of the patients’ pulmonary disease in five patients. One patient presented with acute hemoptysis and died, and one patient recently received a diagnosis of pulmonary Karposi’s sarcoma at another hospital. Chest radiographic findings were the following: nodular opacities in five of seven patients (71%); peribronchovascular opacities in six of seven patients (86%); thickened interlobular septa in two of seven patients (29%); pleural effusion in three of seven patients (43%); and lymphadenopathy in two of seven patients (29%). Five of seven patients (71%) were determined to be in radiographic stage 3, one patient in stage 1, and one patient in stage 2. CT demonstrated additional lymphadenopathy in three of three patients, thickened interlobular septa in two of three patients, and pleural effusion in one of three patients, but it did not change the staging of disease in any patient.

Conclusion: Pulmonary Kaposi’s sarcoma can cause diffuse lung disease in women with AIDS. The disease is usually mistaken clinically for pulmonary infection.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543