0
Laboratory and Animal Investigations |

An Optimal Dose of Perfluorocarbon for Respiratory Mechanics in Partial Liquid Ventilation for Dependent Lung-Dominant Acute Lung Injury*

Chae-Man Lim, MD; Younsuck Koh, MD; Byung O. Jung, MD; Sang D. Lee, MD; Woo S. Kim, MD; Dong S. Kim, MD; Won D. Kim, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Correspondence to: Chae-Man Lim, MD, Asan Medical Center, Songpa P.O. Box 145, Seoul, Korea, 138–600



Chest. 2000;117(1):199-204. doi:10.1378/chest.117.1.199
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: Despite increasing knowledge about partial liquid ventilation (PLV), the optimal dose of perfluorocarbon (PFC) is not yet established. Because there exist normal regions in the lung with ARDS and because PLV in the normal lung results in worsened gas exchange, we postulated that the optimal dose of PFC for PLV may be less than the functional residual capacity (FRC) dose in the lung with limited disease.

Design and setting: Animal study at the Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul, Korea.

Subjects: Twelve rabbits in which dependent lung-dominant lung injury was created by a modified saline solution lavage.

Interventions: PLV performed at six different doses of perfluorodecalin in sequence (3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 mL/kg every 15 min).

Measurements and results: Our modified saline solution lavage induced atelectasis and hemorrhage confined to the dependent lung with severe hypoxia (Pao2/fraction of inspired oxygen = 37 ± 6 mm Hg). Peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and inspiratory pause pressure (Ppause) with PLV were lower at doses of 3 to 15 mL/kg (all p < 0.05), but not different at a dose of 18 mL/kg, when compared with gas ventilation. Ppeak increased at doses of 12, 15, and 18 mL/kg, when each was compared with the preceding PFC dose. At increasing PFC doses, the change in the elastic component of airway pressure (Ppause after minus Ppause before) was negative until the dose of 9 mL/kg, but was positive at doses of 12 mL/kg and above. The change in the resistive component ([Ppeak minus Ppause] after minus [Ppeak minus Ppause] before) was negative until the dose of 6 mL/kg, but was positive at the dose ≥ 9 mL/kg.

Conclusion: Respiratory mechanics during PLV for dependent lung–dominant lung injury were optimal at a PFC dose less than the FRC.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
Oleic Acid vs Saline Solution Lung Lavage-Induced Acute Lung Injury*: Effects on Lung Morphology, Pressure-Volume Relationships, and Response to Positive End-Expiratory Pressure
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543