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The Chicago Emergency Department Asthma Collaborative*

Michael F. McDermott, MD; James Walter, MD; Cathy Catrambone, MS, RN; Kevin B. Weiss, MD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine (Dr. McDermott), Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL; Section of Emergency Medicine (Dr. Walter), University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL; and the Center for Health Services Research (Dr. Weiss and Ms. Catrambone), Rush Primary Care Institute, Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center, Chicago, IL.

Correspondence to: Kevin B. Weiss, MD, Director, Center for Health Services Research, Rush Primary Care Institute, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center, 1653 W Congress Pkwy, Chicago, IL 60612



Chest. 1999;116(suppl_2):196S-197S. doi:10.1378/chest.116.suppl_2.196S
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Emergency departments (EDs) play a crucial role in the management of asthma, often beyond the treatment of acute exacerbations.1 Frequently, they are the main or sole source of medical care for certain populations. National surveys have shown that there is considerable variation among EDs in the assessment, treatment, discharge, and follow-up care of persons with asthma.2 In 1996, the Chicago Asthma Surveillance Initiative conducted a survey of asthma care in the EDs within the Chicago metropolitan area.3 The results of this in-depth local survey were consistent with the national findings and revealed community-wide variations in many key aspects of asthma care.


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