0
Articles |

Development of a Survey of Asthma Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions*: The Chicago Community Asthma Survey

Evalyn N. Grant, MD; Karen Turner-Roan, MPH; Steven R. Daugherty, PhD; Tao Li, PhD; Edward Eckenfels; Claudia Baier, MPH; Michael F. McDermott, MD; Kevin B. Weiss, MD; for the Chicago Asthma Surveillance Initiative Project Team
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: *From the Department of Immunology/Microbiology (Dr. Grant); the Center for Health Services Research (Drs. Daugherty and Li, and Ms. Turner-Roan), Rush Primary Care Institute; and the Department of Preventive Medicine (Mr. Eckenfels and Ms. Baier); Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center; and the Department of Emergency Medicine (Dr. McDermott), Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL. ,  See Appendix for other members of the CASI Project Team.

Correspondence to: Kevin B. Weiss, MD, Director, Center for Health Services Research, Rush Primary Care Institute, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center, 1653 W Congress Pkwy, Chicago, IL 60612


Affiliations: *From the Department of Immunology/Microbiology (Dr. Grant); the Center for Health Services Research (Drs. Daugherty and Li, and Ms. Turner-Roan), Rush Primary Care Institute; and the Department of Preventive Medicine (Mr. Eckenfels and Ms. Baier); Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center; and the Department of Emergency Medicine (Dr. McDermott), Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL. ,  See Appendix for other members of the CASI Project Team.


Chest. 1999;116(suppl_2):178S-183S. doi:10.1378/chest.116.suppl_2.178S
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Little is known about the general public’s perception of the diagnosis of asthma and the impact of asthma on individuals, their families, and their communities. In addition, there appear to be no published survey instruments specifically designed to gain insights into how the general public perceives asthma. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of such an instrument, the Chicago Community Asthma Survey (CCAS)-32. Development began with two qualitative steps. First, a review of the published literature guided the initial instrument construction (Step 1). Content domains were chosen based on clinical input and the Health Belief Model. Most items were derived from existing instruments. To assess content validity, cognitive interviews and expert reviews were conducted (Step 2). Items were added, modified, and deleted based on the information gathered at each of these steps. In the next step, item performance measurement (Step 3), testing of two samples provided quantitative data to further inform item reduction. Items with uniform correct responses or responses lacking in variability were excluded. The result of this three-step process was a 32-item survey of asthma knowledge, attitudes and perceptions, the CCAS-32. The introduction to the survey was subsequently modified to minimize respondent bias (Step 4). In conclusion, the CCAS-32 was constructed with input from experts in asthma and individuals from the Chicago area. The items in the CCAS-32 appear to have both face validity and acceptable performance characteristics.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
Symptom Perception in Pediatric Asthma*: Resistive Loading and In Vivo Assessment Compared
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543