0
Articles |

Increasing Airway Pressures Can Promote Transvascular Edema Reabsorption*

R.M. Effros, MD, FCCP; E.R. Jacobs, MD, FCCP; R.M. Schapira, MD, FCCP; W. Lin; K. Presberg, MD, FCCP
Author and Funding Information

*From the Pulmonary/Critical Care Division, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. Supported by grants NIH HL 18606 and VA 7731-05.

Correspondence to: Richard Effros, MD, FCCP, Chief of Pulmonary and Crit Care Med, Medical College of Wisconsin, 9200 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53226-3522



Chest. 1999;116(suppl_1):30S-31S. doi:10.1378/chest.116.suppl_1.30S
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

Considerable controversy persists concerning the mechanisms of edema reabsorption from the lung and the effect of mechanical ventilation on this process. Lymphatic drainage probably plays a relatively minor role in reabsorbing excess fluid, and it has not been possible to show that increasing serum protein concentrations enhance dehydration of the interstitium. Simultaneous increases in airspace and pleural pressure (Pa and Ppl) at constant lung volumes should increase interstitial pressure, and this would result in the reabsorption of fluid in accordance with Starling principles if interstitial pressures rise above pressures in the vasculature. However, increases in Pa and Ppl above pressures in the vasculature also compress septal vessels, preventing fluid reabsorption.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543