0
Clinical Investigations: CARDIOLOGY |

Coronary Artery Disease in Potential Lung Transplant Recipients > 50 Years Old*: The Role of Coronary Intervention

Gregory I. Snell, FRACP; Meroula Richardson, FRACP; Anne P. Griffiths, RN; Trevor J. Williams, FRACP; Donald S. Esmore, FRACS
Author and Funding Information

*From the Lung and Heart Transplant Service, Alfred Hospital, Prahran, 3181, Victoria, Australia.

Correspondence to: Gregory I. Snell, MBBS, Lung and Heart Transplant Service, Alfred Hospital, Prahran, 3181, Victoria, Australia



Chest. 1999;116(4):874-879. doi:10.1378/chest.116.4.874
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Study objectives: To review the experience of the Alfred Hospital in the systematic assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD) using coronary angiography (CA), and the subsequent management of CAD, in potential lung transplant recipients.

Design: Retrospective study.

Setting: The Alfred Hospital Lung and Heart Transplant Service.

Patients: CAD risk factors were sought in potential recipients of lung transplantation (LTx) who were > 50 years old, including a history of smoking, male gender, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, angina, and a family history of CAD. When feasible, and in the presence of more than one cardiac risk factor, CA was performed.

Results: From 243 referral patients who were > 50 years old, 97 were listed for LTx, and 77 underwent LTx. Four patients were refused LTx on the basis of CAD. Of 101 patients undergoing a detailed cardiac assessment for LTx, 83 had smoked, 56 were male, 48 had hypercholesterolemia, 22 had hypertension, 4 had diabetes, and 3 had a history consistent with angina. Eighty-five patients underwent CA. In 32 cases, CA revealed CAD, and half of these cases were significant stenoses. Eight patients who were assessed required intervention. Five patients of this group have been transplanted; of these, three patients underwent coronary artery grafting at the time of LTx, and two patients underwent preoperative angioplasty or stenting. Only one of these five patients died < 90 days postoperatively.

Conclusion: Significant CAD is a common finding in older patients who are presenting for LTx. Coronary revascularization for severe large vessel stenoses can allow safe LTx. CAD risk factors may predict who should undergo CA, but further studies of clinical and noninvasive assessments of CAD are needed if CA is to be safely avoided in patients at low risk of CAD.

Figures in this Article

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
Guidelines
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543