0
Clinical Investigations: SURGERY |

Determinants of Hospital Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting*

Argyris Michalopoulos, MD, FCCP; George Tzelepis, MD, FCCP; Urania Dafni, PhD; Stefanos Geroulanos, MD, PhD
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: ,  *From the Cardiothoracic ICU, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Athens, Greece.

Affiliations: ,  *From the Cardiothoracic ICU, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Athens, Greece.



Chest. 1999;115(6):1598-1603. doi:10.1378/chest.115.6.1598
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Objectives: To examine causes of death and to find predictors of hospital mortality after elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.

Design: Case-control study.

Setting: Tertiary teaching hospital.

Methods: We prospectively collected various preoperative, operative, and immediate postoperative variables in a cohort of patients undergoing elective CABG surgery.

Results: Of the 2,014 consecutive patients (mean [± SD] age of 61.3 ± 6.7 years old) undergoing elective CABG over a 2-year period, 27 patients (1.3%) died during their hospitalization. The main causes of death (either isolated or in combination) were cardiogenic shock (n = 13), brain death or stroke (n = 7), septic shock (n = 4), ARDS (n = 2), and pulmonary embolism (n = 1). A univariate statistical analysis revealed factors that significantly correlate with outcome: patient age, preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction, bypass time, aortic cross-clamp time, number of blood units transfused, number of inotropic agents administered in the operating room during the first postoperative day (POD), history of arterial hypertension, intra-aortic balloon pump usage, and perioperative development of shock. A logistic regression analysis showed that the combination of the number of inotropes and the number of blood units administered in the operating room during POD 1 was the most important determinant of outcome, with an overall positive predictive value of 91.7%.

Conclusions: We conclude that the analysis of simple variables enhances our ability to accurately predict hospital mortality in patients undergoing elective CABG surgery. The number of inotropic agents and blood transfusions administered during the immediate postoperative period is the most important independent predictor of hospital mortality.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543