0
Clinical Investigations: ASTHMA |

The Association Between Occupation and Asthma in General Medical Practice*

Paul D. Blanc, MD, MSPH, FCCP; Mark D. Eisner, MD; Leslie Israel, DO, MPH; Edward H. Yelin, PhD
Author and Funding Information

*From the Division of Occupational Medicine (Drs. Blanc and Israel), the Arthritis Research Group (Dr. Yelin), Department of Medicine, and the Cardiovascular Research Institute (Dr. Eisner), University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.

Correspondence to: Paul Blanc, MD, MSPH, FCCP, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, UCSF Box 0924, 350 Parnassus Ave, No. 609, San Francisco, CA 94143-0924; e-mail: blancp@itsa.ucsf.edu



Chest. 1999;115(5):1259-1264. doi:10.1378/chest.115.5.1259
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background: In general practice settings, the proportion of adult asthma attributable to occupational factors is not known.

Objective: The goal of this study was to estimate the proportion of adult asthma cases that can be attributed to occupational factors initiating new disease onset and exacerbating preexisting disease.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of interview data for 150 adults with asthma recruited from a random sample of family practice specialists. We ascertained the asthma and work histories of the subjects and estimated the proportion with likely work-initiated asthma and work-related asthma recrudescence.

Results: Seventy-four subjects (49%) reported adult-onset asthma while employed; an additional 25 (17%) reported recrudescence of previously quiescent childhood-onset asthma during employment. Of those with new-onset asthma while employed, 15 (10% of the study group; 95% confidence interval, 5 to 15%) were employed in occupations at increased risk of occupational asthma initiation on the basis of an independent job scoring matrix. Of those with asthma recrudescence in adulthood, seven (5% of the study group; 95% confidence interval, 2 to 8%) were employed in occupations at increased risk of exposures aggravating asthma.

Conclusions: Among adults with asthma treated in general practice settings, > 1 in 10 patients has a work history strongly suggestive of a potential relationship between exposure and disease.

Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval; SF-36 = Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Topics

asthma

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543