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Reversible Myocardial Contraction Abnormalities in Patients With an Acute Noncardiac Illness

Scott W. Sharkey; Wendy Shear; Morrison Hodges; Charles A. Herzog
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: From the Minneapolis Heart Institute, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis,  From the Cardiology Division, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis

Affiliations: From the Minneapolis Heart Institute, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis,  From the Cardiology Division, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis


1998 by the American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 1998;114(1):98-105. doi:10.1378/chest.114.1.98
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Abstract

Study objectives: Reversible myocardial contraction abnormalities are usually observed in patients with acute ischemic syndromes caused by coronary artery disease. In this study, we report the occurrence of reversible anterior-apical contraction abnormalities in patients with an acute noncardiac illness.

Setting: This was a retrospective study of 22 patients with the following characteristics: (1) hospitalization for an acute noncardiac illness; (2) appearance of deep T-wave inversion in the precordial leads of the ECG; and (3) presence of an anterior wall motion abnormality on an echocardiogram. Standard clinical information was collected together with results of serial ECGs, echocardiograms, and coronary angiograms.

Results: The primary diagnoses for the 22 acutely ill patients included CNS injury (n=6); sepsis (n=3); acute pulmonary disease (n=3); drug overdose or metabolic abnormality (n=7); and post noncardiac surgery (n=3). An initial echocardiogram revealed an anterior apical wall motion abnormality. At follow-up, all patients had progressive improvement in anterior wall motion with return of normal wall motion in 16 patients (73%). All patients evolved deep T-wave inversion (average, 7.8 mm) and QT interval lengthening in the precordial leads. Coronary angiography revealed a significant stenosis in the likely culprit artery (left anterior descending) in only one patient.

Conclusion: A reversible cardiac contraction abnormality of the anterior wall and apex of the left ventricle can complicate the clinical course of critically ill patients in the absence of significant coronary artery disease. This phenomenon is associated with striking T-wave inversion and QT interval lengthening. Mechanisms other than myocardial ischemia may lead to the occurrence of reversible regional myocardial contraction abnormalities.


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