0
Articles |

Tracheal Bronchus : A Cause of Prolonged Atelectasis in Intubated Children FREE TO VIEW

Brian P. O'Sullivan; Joseph J. Frassica; Shawn M. Rayder
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester,  From the Departments of Pediatrics, Anesthesia, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester,  From the Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester

Affiliations: From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester,  From the Departments of Pediatrics, Anesthesia, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester,  From the Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester

Affiliations: From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester,  From the Departments of Pediatrics, Anesthesia, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester,  From the Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester


1998 by the American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 1998;113(2):537-540. doi:10.1378/chest.113.2.537
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Abstract

Tracheal bronchus is a common anomaly that occurs in approximately 2% of people. Two children with multiple medical problems which led to endotracheal intubation are described. The hospital course for each child was complicated by persistent right upper lobe atelectasis. The presence of a tracheal bronchus was not recognized in either case initially; identification of this anatomic variant allowed appropriate changes in airway management. The potential for tracheal bronchus to cause, or be associated with, localized pulmonary problems is reviewed. The diagnosis of tracheal bronchus should be considered early in the course of intubated patients with right upper lobe complications.


Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

CHEST Journal Articles
CHEST Collections
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543