0
Articles |

Impact of Habitual Cocaine Smoking on the Physiologic Response to Maximum Exercise

Jose A. Marques-Magallanes; Eric C. Kleerup; Donald P. Tashkin; Christopher B. Cooper; Shankar N. Koyal
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: From the Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles,  From the Departments of Medicine and Physiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles,  From the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Los Angeles

Affiliations: From the Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles,  From the Departments of Medicine and Physiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles,  From the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Los Angeles

Affiliations: From the Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles,  From the Departments of Medicine and Physiology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles,  From the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Los Angeles


1997 by the American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 1997;112(4):1008-1016. doi:10.1378/chest.112.4.1008
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Abstract

Background: Habitual smoking of alkaloidal cocaine (crack) has been reported to be associated with a number of cardiopulmonary complications that may not be clinically obvious but could potentially interfere with normal physiologic responses to exercise and thus impair maximum exercise performance.

Study objective: To evaluate the impact of regular use of cocaine on maximum exercise.

Design: Observational study in crack users and age- and gender-matched control subjects.

Subjects: Thirty-five habitual cocaine smokers (21 male and 14 female) and 29 age-matched sedentary control nonsmokers of cocaine (15 male and 14 female), all of whom were in good general health.

Methods: In these subjects, we compared physiologic responses to symptom-limited, incremental maximal exercise performed on a cycle ergometer using a ramp protocol. Comparisons were made for men and women separately.

Results: For both men and women, long-term cocaine smokers had a reduced aerobic capacity (maximum oxygen consumption) compared with control nonsmokers but did not show evidence of ventilatory limitation, reduced gas exchange threshold, increased physiologic dead space, or gas exchange abnormality at maximum exercise compared with the healthy control subjects. Although cocaine smokers had reduced maximum heart rates compared with control subjects, the relationship between submaximal heart rate and oxygen uptake was normal, indicating a normal cardiovascular response pattern. However, effort perception was similar between the two groups despite the difference in heart rate at maximum exercise, suggesting the possibility of perceptual dysfunction for effort. Differences in aerobic capacity between the crack users and nonusers could not be explained by differences in physical fitness or altered perception of dyspnea.

Conclusion: In the subjects we studied, long-term cocaine smoking was associated with reduced maximum exercise performance, probably due to poor motivation or altered effort perception. No other identifiable physiologic abnormality appeared to limit exercise in the habitual crack users.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543