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Distinctive Clinical Features of Portopulmonary Hypertension FREE TO VIEW

Paul C. Kuo; Jeffrey S. Plotkin; Lynt B. Johnson; Charles D. Howell; Jacqueline M. Laurin; Stephen T. Bartlett; Lewis J. Rubin
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: From the Department of Surgery, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore,  From the Department of Anesthesia, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore,  From the Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore

Affiliations: From the Department of Surgery, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore,  From the Department of Anesthesia, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore,  From the Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore

Affiliations: From the Department of Surgery, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore,  From the Department of Anesthesia, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore,  From the Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore


1997 by the American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 1997;112(4):980-986. doi:10.1378/chest.112.4.980
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Abstract

Study objective: To differentiate the cardiopulmonary profile of portopulmonary hypertension (PPHTN) from that of primary pulmonary hypertension and chronic liver disease.

Design: Retrospective survey.

Setting: Tertiary care center.

Patients: Thirty patients with cardiac catheterization-proven PPHTN were compared to 30 randomly selected patients with primary pulmonary hypertension alone and 30 patients with chronic liver disease alone necessitating consideration of liver transplantation (L-CONT).

Interventions: All patients underwent right heart catheterization, echocardiography, ECG, chest radiography, pulmonary function tests, ventilation-perfusion scanning, and room air arterial blood gas measurements.

Results: Patients with PPHTN exhibited elevated pulmonary pressures (mean pulmonary pressure, 48.6±2.1 mm Hg) and pulmonary vascular resistance (11.6±1.6 mm Hg/L/min/m2) with simultaneous elevation in the cardiac index (3.8±0.3 L/min/m2) and depression of systemic vascular resistance (24.9±1.7 mm Hg/L/min/m2). Arterial blood gas measurements indicate that PPHTN exhibits a significant accentuation of the chronic respiratory alkalosis (Pco2, 28.7±0.5 mm Hg) usually seen with chronic liver disease and pulmonary hypertension. In addition, patients with PPHTN have an increased alveolar-arterial gradient (27.0±2.7 mm Hg) when compared to patients with L-CONT, suggesting impaired gas exchange.

Conclusions: PPHTN is associated with a unique clinical profile that possesses characteristics common to and exclusive of liver disease and primary pulmonary hypertension.


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