0
Articles |

Surgically Treated Pneumothorax : Radiologic and Pathologic Findings

Kirk G. Jordan; J. Stephen Kwong; Julia Flint; Nestor L. Müller
Author and Funding Information

Affiliations: From the Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia and Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada,  From the Department of Pathology, University of British Columbia and Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Affiliations: From the Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia and Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada,  From the Department of Pathology, University of British Columbia and Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada


1997 by the American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 1997;111(2):280-285. doi:10.1378/chest.111.2.280
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Abstract

Objective: To compare the identifiable pulmonary abnormalities on preoperative chest radiographs and CT scans with the histologic findings in patients requiring surgical intervention for recurrent or persistent pneumothoraces.

Materials and methods: Chest radiographs were reviewed retrospectively in 116 consecutive patients (aged 16 to 81 years) who had undergone thoracotomy for recurrent or persistent pneumothorax. CT scans were performed in 21 patients. Chest radiographs and CT scans were reviewed by two observers without knowledge of the histologic findings. All specimens were reviewed by a surgical pathologist.

Results: Seventy-nine (68%) patients had parenchymal abnormalities and five (4%) had pleural thickening evident on the radiograph. The most common radiographic abnormalities included apical bullae (n=51), apical scarring (n=17), and diffuse emphysema (n=9). Twenty of 21 (95%) CT scans demonstrated either a parenchymal or a pleural abnormality. CT demonstrated emphysema in four patients with normal radiographs, as well as additional findings in six patients with abnormal radiographs. Histologically, 74 patients had focal irregular emphysema, 26 had distal acinar emphysema, six had mixed emphysema, four had isolated bullae or blebs, two had mesothelioma, and one each had the following: metastatic angiosarcoma, subpleural fibrosis, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, and tuberculous pleuritis with inactive interstitial fibrosis and honeycombing.

Conclusion: Most patients with surgically treated pneumothorax have emphysema or an isolated bulla. Although these findings may not be apparent on the radiograph and seen on CT, this probably does not affect patient management. In most cases of pneumothorax related to other causes, findings consistent with the diagnosis can be seen on the radiograph.


Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Figures

Tables

References

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Sign In to Access Full Content

MEMBER & INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIBER

Want Access?

NEW TO CHEST?

Become a CHEST member and receive a FREE subscription as a benefit of membership.

Individuals can purchase this article on ScienceDirect.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal.

Individuals can purchase a subscription to the journal or buy individual articles.

Learn more about membership or Purchase a Full Subscription.

INSTITUTIONAL ACCESS

Institutional access is now available through ScienceDirect and can be purchased at myelsevier.com.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Find Similar Articles
CHEST Journal Articles
PubMed Articles
  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543