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Treatment of Toad Venom Poisoning With Digoxin-Specific Fab Fragments FREE TO VIEW

Jeffrey R. Brubacher; Michael B. Heller; Padinjarekuttu R. Ravikumar; Theodore Bania; Robert S. Hoffman
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Affiliations: From the New York City Poison Control Center, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the Bureau of Laboratories, and the Environmental Sciences Division, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the Bureau of Laboratories, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the New York City Poison Control Center, New York City Department of Health; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Bellevue Hospital Center, New York

Affiliations: From the New York City Poison Control Center, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the Bureau of Laboratories, and the Environmental Sciences Division, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the Bureau of Laboratories, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the New York City Poison Control Center, New York City Department of Health; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Bellevue Hospital Center, New York

Affiliations: From the New York City Poison Control Center, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the Bureau of Laboratories, and the Environmental Sciences Division, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the Bureau of Laboratories, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the New York City Poison Control Center, New York City Department of Health; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Bellevue Hospital Center, New York

Affiliations: From the New York City Poison Control Center, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the Bureau of Laboratories, and the Environmental Sciences Division, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the Bureau of Laboratories, New York City Department of Health, New York,  From the New York City Poison Control Center, New York City Department of Health; and the Department of Emergency Medicine, Bellevue Hospital Center, New York


1996 by the American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 1996;110(5):1282-1288. doi:10.1378/chest.110.5.1282
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Abstract

Toxicity from toad venom poisoning is similar to digoxin toxicity and carries a high mortality rate. We report on six previously healthy men who developed vomiting and bradycardia after ingesting a purported topical aphrodisiac. Each patient had positive apparent digoxin levels and the first four patients died of cardiac dysrhythmias. The last two patients recovered following treatment with digoxin Fab fragments. We analyzed samples of the purported aphrodisiac and found that it was identical to Chan Su, a Chinese medication made from toad venom. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of digoxin Fab fragments to treat toad venom poisoning.


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