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Clinical and Echocardiographic Correlates of Symptomatic Tachydysrhythmias After Noncardiac Thoracic Surgery FREE TO VIEW

David Amar; Nancy Roistacher; Michael Burt; Ruth A. Reinsel; Robert J. Ginsberg; Roger S. Wilson
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Affiliations: From the Departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College, New York,  From the Departments of Medicine and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College, New York,  From the Departments of Surgery, and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College, New York

Affiliations: From the Departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College, New York,  From the Departments of Medicine and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College, New York,  From the Departments of Surgery, and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College, New York

Affiliations: From the Departments of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College, New York,  From the Departments of Medicine and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College, New York,  From the Departments of Surgery, and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Cornell University Medical College, New York


1995 BY THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CHEST PHYSICIANS


Chest. 1995;108(2):349-354. doi:10.1378/chest.108.2.349
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Abstract

Background: Supraventricular tachydysrhythmias (SVTs) following thoracic surgery occur with significant frequency and may be associated with increased morbidity. Prospective data on the etiology and importance of these dysrhythmias are sparse.

Methods: In 100 patients undergoing pulmonary resection without history of atrial dysrhythmias or previous thoracic surgery, we examined the effects of predefined risk factors by history, pulmonary function, and echocardiography on the incidence of postoperative SVT. Serial echocardiograms were performed preoperatively, on postoperative day 1, and again between postoperative days 2 to 6 (median=3) to evaluate cardiovascular function and to estimate right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) by the tricuspid regurgitation jet (TRJ) Doppler velocity method.

Results: Symptomatic postoperative SVT occurred in 18 (18%) of the 100 patients studied at a median of 3 days after surgery and was disabling in 12 of 18 (67%). Digoxin loading was ineffective in controlling the ventricular response in 16 of 17 episodes. In the patients developing SVT, postoperative echocardiography revealed significant elevation of TRJ Doppler velocity (2.7±0.6 m/s vs 2.3±0.6 m/s, p<0.05) but not right atrial or ventricular enlargement or right atrial pressure increase when compared with patients without SVT. Independent correlates of SVT determined in a stepwise logistic regression included intraoperative blood loss ≥1 L (p=0.0001) and a postoperative TRJ Doppler velocity ≥2.7 m/s (p<0.05). Patients who developed SVT had a higher rate of intensive care unit admission (p<0.004), a longer hospital stay (p<0.02), and higher 30-day mortality (p<0.02).

Conclusions: These prospective data suggest that increased right heart pressure but not fluid overload or right heart enlargement predisposes to clinically significant SVT after pulmonary resection. SVT may be an important marker of poor cardiopulmonary reserve in patients who develop significant morbidity after thoracic surgery. Early interventions to reduce right heart pressure may decrease the incidence of postoperative SVT and potentially improve overall surgical outcomes.


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