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Poster Presentations: Wednesday, October 26, 2011 |

Reference Equations for Lung Function, Lung Volumes, and Carbon Monoxide Diffusing Capacity of Healthy Never Smoking Adults Aged 18-91 Years FREE TO VIEW

Pavlos Michailopoulos, MD; Paraskevi Argiropoulou, PhD; Ioannis Kioumis, PhD; Theofilos Pechlivanidis, MD; Dionisios Spyratos, PhD; Lazaros Sichletidis, PhD
Chest. 2011;140(4_MeetingAbstracts):678A. doi:10.1378/chest.1119659
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Abstract

PURPOSE: Reference equations recommended by ATS and ERS or those most commonly used by respiratory institutions, are based on studies around 30 years old, not complying with (ATS/ERS) guidelines. Our aim was to 1) develop reference equations for all parameters of a spirometry using current guidelines and 2) compare the equations with those most commonly used.

METHODS: Healthy subjects of Caucasian origin (243 male and 245 female) aged 18-91 years were recruited, after completing a respiratory questionnaire. All of them were never smokers (<1 pack-years), without any respiratory or major cardiovascular disease with a normal X-ray image during the last 5 years. They had a spirometry and a single breath lung volumes and TLCO measurement following ATS/ERS guidelines. Curvilinear regression equations were constructed incorporating age and height as predictors. Models from the present study were then compared with the most practiced models.

RESULTS: Curvilinear regression equations are preferable since they provide better fit to the data and have a dramatically higher accuracy as measured in terms of the residual mean squared error. Comparison of our models with the existing ones verified that ECSC equations clearly underestimate lung function parameters, whereas models of NHANES II and a recent study for the English population slightly overestimate them.

CONCLUSIONS: Curvilinear regression equations are preferable since they provide better fit to the data and have a dramatically higher accuracy as measured in terms of the residual mean squared error. Comparison of our models with the existing ones verified that ECSC equations clearly underestimate lung function parameters, whereas models of NHANES II and a recent study for the English population slightly overestimate them.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The development of new reference equations according to ERS/ATS guidelines, adapted to the new anthropometric data (height, trunk: leg ratio) and exogenous factors (nutrition, exercise, air quality and occupational exposure), upon comparison with lung function tests of the individuals, should have immediate effect on decisions for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of various respiratory conditions. The fact that this study covers all spirometry parameters fulfills ERS recommendations that all reference values used should become from one and only source of reference equations.

DISCLOSURE: The following authors have nothing to disclose: Pavlos Michailopoulos, Paraskevi Argiropoulou, Ioannis Kioumis, Theofilos Pechlivanidis, Dionisios Spyratos, Lazaros Sichletidis

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