0
Correspondence |

Response FREE TO VIEW

Pierre-Yves Jayet, MD; Claudio Sartori, MD; Urs Scherrer, MD; Thomas Stuber, MD; Yves Allemann, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Botnar Center for Extreme Medicine (Drs Jayet, Sartori, and Scherrer), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois; and the Swiss Cardiovascular Center Bern (Drs Stuber and Allemann), University Hospital.

Correspondence to: Yves Allemann, MD, Cardiology, Swiss Cardiovascular Center Bern, University Hospital, Inselspital, 3010 Bern, Switzerland; e-mail: yves.allemann@insel.ch


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The authors have reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2010 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2010;138(3):758. doi:10.1378/chest.10-0927
Text Size: A A A
Published online

To the Editor:

In our recent article in CHEST,1 we suggested that in patients suffering from chronic mountain disease (CMS), the exaggerated increase in pulmonary-artery pressure during mild exercise is not related to a difference in the extent of the pulmonary microcirculation because carbon monoxide diffusing capacity was comparable in patients with CMS and control subjects.1 Johnson suggests that to reinforce this conclusion, the data should be analyzed further and reported as percent predicted values adjusted for lung volume. Percent predicted carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (143% ± 22% vs 157% ± 25%, P = .15), carbon monoxide diffusing capacity per unit of alveolar volume (137% ± 13% vs 130% ± 23%, P = .30), carbon monoxide diffusing capacity adjusted for lung volume (142% ± 20% vs 143% ± 23%, P = .92), and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity per unit of alveolar volume adjusted for lung volume (137% ± 14% vs 145% ± 23%, P = .29) were similar in patients with CMS and control subjects. These additional data further strenghten our conclusion that the large differences in pulmonary-artery pressure responsiveness between patients with CMS and healthy control subjects are not related to differences in the pulmonary microcirculation between the two groups.

Stuber T, Sartori C, Schwab M, et al. Exaggerated pulmonary hypertension during mild exercise in chronic mountain sickness. Chest. 2010;1372:388-392. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 

Figures

Tables

References

Stuber T, Sartori C, Schwab M, et al. Exaggerated pulmonary hypertension during mild exercise in chronic mountain sickness. Chest. 2010;1372:388-392. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
 
NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

  • CHEST Journal
    Print ISSN: 0012-3692
    Online ISSN: 1931-3543