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The Clustering of Disorders Related to Childhood Sleep-Disordered Breathing: Are They Related to a Single Mechanism?

Ann C. Halbower, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the University of Colorado-Denver School of Medicine and The Children’s Hospital.

Correspondence to: Ann C. Halbower, MD, University of Colorado-Denver School of Medicine and The Children’s Hospital, 13123 E 16th Ave, B-395, Aurora, CO 80045; e-mail: Halbower.ann@tchden.org


Financial/nonfinancial disclosures: The author has reported to CHEST that no potential conflicts of interest exist with any companies/organizations whose products or services may be discussed in this article.

Funding/Support: This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health [Grants K23 RR 024257-03, MO1-RR00069].

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians (http://www.chestpubs.org/site/misc/reprints.xhtml).


© 2010 American College of Chest Physicians


Chest. 2010;138(3):469-471. doi:10.1378/chest.10-0786
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Extract

Among the many articles on childhood sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in the last several years, there is a recurring theme: an array of comorbidities. Whether the disorder is defined as habitual snoring, upper airway resistance syndrome, or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), studies have consistently linked SDB in children with seemingly unrelated symptoms of neuropsychologic deficits, obesity, cardiovascular abnormalities, parasomnias, and inflammation. In addition, there appears to be a genetic association for childhood SDB. In the current issue of CHEST (see page 519), Li and colleagues1 have performed a large-scale population survey of symptom clusters and have demonstrated that all of these comorbid symptoms of SDB are increased in a population of children with habitual snoring. Their study in > 6,000 children aged 5 to 14 years with habitual snoring suggests an association of SDB with genetic influences, BMI, neuropsychologic problems, and inflammation, including recent upper-respiratory infection, allergic rhinitis, tonsillitis, and sinusitis. Do these clinical features relate to a single mechanism?

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