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Original Research: Asthma |

Effects of Weight Loss on Airway Responsiveness in Obese Adults With AsthmaDoes Weight Loss Lead to Reversibility of Asthma?: Does Weight Loss Lead to Reversibility of Asthma?

Smita Pakhale, MD; Justine Baron, PhD; Robert Dent, MD; Katherine Vandemheen, MSc; Shawn D. Aaron, MD
Author and Funding Information

From the Department of Medicine (Drs Pakhale, Dent, and Aaron), The Ottawa Hospital; University of Ottawa (Drs Pakhale, Baron, Dent, and Aaron); and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (Drs Pakhale, Baron, Dent, and Aaron and Ms Vandemheen), Ottawa, ON, Canada.

CORRESPONDENCE TO: Smita Pakhale, MD, Department of Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON K1H 8L6, Canada; e-mail: spakhale@ohri.ca


FUNDING/SUPPORT: Funding for this study was provided by the Department of Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, and the Ontario Thoracic Society.

Reproduction of this article is prohibited without written permission from the American College of Chest Physicians. See online for more details.


Chest. 2015;147(6):1582-1590. doi:10.1378/chest.14-3105
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BACKGROUND:  The growing epidemics of obesity and asthma are major public health concerns. Although asthma-obesity links are widely studied, the effects of weight loss on asthma severity measured by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) have received limited attention. The main study objective was to examine whether weight reduction reduces asthma severity in obese adults with asthma.

METHODS:  In a prospective, controlled, parallel-group study, we followed 22 obese participants with asthma aged 18 to 75 years with a BMI ≥ 32.5 kg/m2 and AHR (provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 [PC20] < 16 mg/mL). Sixteen participants followed a behavioral weight reduction program for 3 months, and six served as control subjects. The primary outcome was change in AHR over 3 months. Changes in lung function, asthma control, and quality of life were secondary outcomes.

RESULTS:  At study entry, participant mean ± SD age was 44 ± 9 years, 95% were women, and mean BMI was 45.7 ± 9.2 kg/m2. After 3 months, mean weight loss was 16.5 ± 9.9 kg in the intervention group, and the control group had a mean weight gain of 0.6 ± 2.6 kg. There were significant improvements in PC20 (P = .009), FEV1 (P = .009), FVC (P = .010), asthma control (P < .001), and asthma quality of life (P = .003) in the intervention group, but these parameters remained unchanged in the control group. Physical activity levels also increased significantly in the intervention group but not in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS:  Weight loss in obese adults with asthma can improve asthma severity, AHR, asthma control, lung function, and quality of life. These findings support the need to actively pursue healthy weight-loss measures in this population.

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